Albie Lake. One by One they Come.

One by One they Come

Cramped and constricted.

In their own country they were convicted

Their bodies sweating in the humid air.

They left in absolute despair.

 

The cries of sick children are heard throughout the ship.

Many have already perished on this nightmare of a trip.

With no help or solution anyone can provide.

The number is rising on this boat of all those who died.

 

Men argue over their small amount of rations.

The tiny amount of food provides for very tense relations

With not enough food everyone begs for more.

It feels like the start of a small civil war.

 

The endless eternal sea rocks calmly back and forth.

The unforgiving blue abyss providing no support.

No land in sight the soulless sea enjoys the pain it’s serving out.

The people were in a dire state of that there was no doubt.

 

“Don’t go there, you’ll die,” many people had said.

They were in danger so they quickly and quietly fled.

They had ignored their warnings and now had to pay the price.

But now they realised that it was foolish to ignore this advice.

 

Their meagre supplies were out and with one more cruel blow

They realised that humanity had sunk to a brand new low.

Pirates climbed aboard and took their supplies by force.

As the children screamed they showed not one sign of remorse.

 

But then a miracle occurred, land was up ahead!

Jumping up and down “We’re here” they blissfully said.

Laughter, smiles and happiness could be seen all around.

And as they got closer, attention was on their destined ground.

 

Then it happened, the event that crushed their hopes and dreams.

The cruel reality of our country’s brutal regime.

A ship sailed up to them and told them to turn around.

The horrible sound of those two words caused many to breakdown.

 

One by One they come and One by One we turn them back again.

We ignore their pain, here’s no excuse for it.

It’s completely unhumane.

 

Albie Lake is a 13 y.o. student at St Ignatius College, Riverview, Sydney.  This poem was composed for an English Competition for Year 9.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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