Tag Archives: Grattan Institute

HAROLD LEVIEN. Solving our Housing Problem.

Housing investors have largely crowded out first-home-buyers from the Sydney and Melbourne housing markets. The Coalition Government has not simply failed to address this problem; its policies have been the principal cause.  

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HAL SWERISSEN and STEPHEN DUCKETT. Is a tax on sugary drinks “bonkers”?

The evidence is that currently there are significant harms and costs associated with the consumption of sugary drinks, both to those who are obese and the community more generally. 

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CHRIS BONNOR. School funding: Grattan’s timely circuit breaker

Chris Bonnor contends that the Grattan Institute report has resurrected the missing link in the sporadic implementation of Gonski. 

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STEPHEN DUCKETT. Blood money: pathology cuts can reduce spending without compromising health

In the coming weeks I will be posting articles on the high costs and corporate nature of pathology in Australian. The following article by Stephen Duckett in The Conversation, even though posted in February this year, helps set the scene. … Continue reading

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John Austen. Grattan Institute on transport projects: a better mousetrap?

In ‘Road to riches: better transport investment’ the respected Grattan Institute joined commentators, independent authorities and lobby groups in advancing ideas on transport ‘investment’. Like others it proposed publication of assessments for public spending; a better mousetrap to ensnare politically … Continue reading

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Luke Fraser. Grattan in the transport pantomime: ‘You’re getting colder … ‘

Earlier this month the Grattan Institute made its first major report into transport, producing Roads to Riches: better transport spending[i]. The 70-page report is replete with interesting-enough statistics, but it misses the mark on the major problems and where solutions … Continue reading

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Stephen Duckett. Blood money: pathology cuts can reduce spending without compromising health

The Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) set the cat among the pathology pigeons late last year. One of the government’s flagged changes, estimated to save around A$100 million a year, was to abolish the bulk-billing incentive Labor introduced in … Continue reading

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Michael Keating. Tax Reform and Future Federal-State Relations

All informed opinion is that fiscal repair in Australia will require action on the revenue side as well as the expenditure side of the Budget. Accordingly at least some tax reform is essential and unavoidable. In addition, reform of the … Continue reading

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Stephen Duckett. Frequent flyers in health and the way we remunerate doctors.

Time for policy rethink as frequent GP attenders account for 41% of costs. The Commonwealth government’s big idea for primary health care in the past year was to charge everyone who visits the GP a A$7 co-payment. The idea had … Continue reading

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