Category Archives: Human Rights

KATE MALTBY. What to Expect When a Woman Accuses a Man in Power.

Last week, the world gazed on as Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testified against a man backed by the strongest political forces in America. I couldn’t watch.

Posted in Human Rights, International Affairs | 2 Comments

JOHN FALZON.Morrison’s mantra is ‘choice’. But what real choice do the poor and homeless have?

Everyone was walking past, refusing to meet her eyes. She wasn’t asking for somewhere to live. She wasn’t even asking for something to live on. All she was asking for was just enough to buy some breakfast. But everyone just … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 1 Comment

SUSAN RYAN. Ladies in Red.

In the late 1970s, federal Labor, still in opposition after Whitlam, was struggling. New polling research enabled me to advise national conference that Labor would not regain office unless it increased its support among women voters. If women had voted … Continue reading

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TAMSIN SHAW. Edward Snowden Reconsidered (New York Review of Books Daily 13.09.18)

This summer, the fifth anniversary of Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA surveillance passed quietly, adrift on a tide of news that now daily sweeps the ground from under our feet. It has been a long five years, and not a … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 2 Comments

KIM WINGEREI. The responsibility of free speech.

I don’t like what Steve Bannon has to say. I find Nigel Farrage’s attempts at shrouding his anti-immigration messages in “Judeo-Christian values” abhorrent. But I am also quite certain that neither pose more nor less of a threat to Australia … Continue reading

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STEPHANIE DOWRICK. Exposing the myths of “border protection” we will see the refugees as real people; and act accordingly.

On Thursday morning of the Liberals’ week of mayhem, facing front benches empty of ministers and with the day’s sitting of Parliament about to be shut down, ALP leader Bill Shorten said: “The purpose of government is to uplift the … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Refugees, Immigration | 7 Comments

JOHN MENADUE. Peter Dutton is an embarrassment for all of us. Repost from March 21 2018

Peter Dutton failed as Health Minister.  His track record since then is even worse. 

Posted in Human Rights, International Affairs, Politics | 14 Comments

HENRY REYNOLDS. Ethno-nationalism and Australia’s place in the world.

Ethno-nationalism is resurgent in many European countries, in the United States and in Israel. Hostility to immigration and to refugees is widespread. The Australian debate about the level of immigration is a mild symptom of the present malaise. Andrew Bolt’s … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Media, Politics | 4 Comments

MICHAEL JENSON. Nigerian farmers are under attack, so why don’t we hear about it?

We’ve heard a lot lately about white South African farmers being killed in farm murders. But another group of African farmers are being killed in far greater numbers and we’ve barely heard a whimper.

Posted in Human Rights, International Affairs | 1 Comment

GOOD READING AND LISTENING FOR THE WEEKEND

A regular collection of links to writings and broadcasts covered in other media.

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GOOD READING AND LISTENING FOR THE WEEKEND

A regular collection of links to writings and broadcasts covered in other media.

Posted in Defence/Security, Economy, Human Rights, SERIES: Freedom, opportunity and security | Comments Off on GOOD READING AND LISTENING FOR THE WEEKEND

ELAINE PEARSON. Cambodia’s ‘dirty dozen’ have no place in Australia.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen’s crackdown on dissent is in full swing ahead of national elections later this month. But who are the generals around Hun Sen who act like a praetorian guard protecting him and the ruling party, helping … Continue reading

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JOHAN LIDBERG. When whistleblowers are prosecuted, it has a chilling effect on press freedom in Australia.

Fear is a tricky thing. It’s often hard to distinguish between what is real and perceived danger. US President Donald Trump, being more comfortable with autocrats than democratic leaders, is arguably a real danger to the world order.

Posted in Defence/Security, Human Rights, Media | 3 Comments

VINCENT CHEOK. Understanding China and the Chinese – An Australian Perspective – Part 1.

My parents were Hakka Chinese from Malaysia. I came to Australia as a minor in 1968 and have been here ever since. The first time that I knew I was ‘special’ as a Chinese was when I was working in … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Refugees, Immigration | 2 Comments

JOHN MENADUE Why are Australian defence correspondents so quiet about complaints to the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court on the use of Australian and Latin American mercenaries by UAE in the war against Yemen (Arab Organisation for Human Rights in the UK)

ANCILE Avocats French law firm filed a complaint with the Public Prosecutor’s Office at the International Criminal Court (ICC) on the use of an army of mercenaries trained in the UAE and sent to participate in the ongoing war in … Continue reading

Posted in Defence/Security, Human Rights | 4 Comments

TONY SMITH. Hostage to the masculine sense of entitlement.

When a society seems unable to ameliorate its social problems, something is obviously amiss. People in the USA might despair of ever breaking free of the pervasive firearms culture which is implicated in frequent mass shootings. In Australia, we have … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Politics | 1 Comment

GEORGE BROWNING. Domestic Violence

Last week we were confronted with domestic violence in the most tragic of circumstances as a NSW father became the brutal killer of his two teenage children. Most Australians will have found this news inexplicable. How could a father submerge … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 2 Comments

ANDREW JAKUBOWICZ. A Rose by Any Other Name: Reflections on the future of race discrimination and vilification in Australia

In a penultimate spate of inter-personal hostility between the current Race Discrimination Commissioner and his opponents in government and the media, the future of a Commissioner (RDC) and the enabling Racial Discrimination Act (RDA) have been flagged by Attorney General … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 3 Comments

JONATHAN FREEDLAND. Inspired by Trump, the world could be heading back to the 1930s.

The US president tears children from parents, and in Europe his imitators dehumanise migrants. We know where such hatred leads. 

Posted in Human Rights, International Affairs | 5 Comments

SPENCER ZIFCAK. Vigil for Eurydice Dixon

Eurydice Dixon was raped and murdered no more than shouting distance from where I live. Had she screamed I might have heard her cry from across Melbourne Cemetery. But if she did, no one heard her.

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ANDREW LEIGH. Rising to the challenge of inequality.

Thomas Piketty and his colleagues have used new data to track inequality and sharpen the choices we face. 

Posted in Economy, Human Rights | 2 Comments

ANDREW JAKUBOWICZ. A peace treaty to end the low-intensity guerilla campaign against the indigenous population.

Australia is a nation and a state established on grounds belonging to Indigenous owners, through a war which has never ended.

Posted in Human Rights | 3 Comments

ANDREW HAMILTON. Triggs champions common compassion (Eureka Street 12/6/2018)

Common compassion is an aspiration more widely praised as a gift of Western Civilisation than accepted and practiced. But once government trash it with impunity we are all the losers.  

Posted in Human Rights | 1 Comment

ELAINE PEARSON. Australia’s Government must guard against foreign interference, but not by curbing our rights.

Authoritarian governments around the world use broadly drafted national security laws to silence human rights defenders, journalists, bloggers, and critics of the government. Australia should not join them by passing a revised espionage and foreign interference law that excludes safeguards … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 1 Comment

KARL HOWARD. The importance of community .

Communities are a fundamental requirement for the human condition; they consist of a group of people with shared interests, similar attitudes – often with aligned social values -resulting in delegated responsibilities. A community is a product of independent actors joining … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 2 Comments

JOAN STAPLES. Foreign interference bills threaten civil society freedoms.

The government’s urgent pursuit of foreign interference bills prior to the July by-elections aims to wedge Labor for short term electoral gain.  However as Labor agrees to support the bills, yet more of our political freedoms are being destroyed at … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Politics | 2 Comments

MICHAEL McKINLEY. A possible deep-seated flaw in the ADF’s third inquiry into allegations of misconduct and war crimes.

The allegations against rogue elements within the Special Air Service Regiment are, sadly, almost predictable: other, similar units in the military traditions of both Britain and the United States have succumbed to such behaviour in similar circumstances as those faced … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights | 1 Comment

MIKE WALLER. Welcome to the Panopticon: time for an Australian bill of rights?

Panopticon: a circular prison with cells arranged around a central well, from which prisoners could at all times be observed (Jeremy Bentham).  Mr Turnbull has told Neil Mitchell security and police will be given extra power to conduct random checks … Continue reading

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KIERAN TAPSELL. The ball is in Pope Francis’s court over the culture of cover-up.

Pope Francis’ letter to the people of Chile over child sexual abuse in that country and its cover-up would suggest that he might have read the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. Instead … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Religion and Faith | 4 Comments

BIJAY KUMAR MINJ. Modi’s four years ‘have weakened India’s tolerance’.

India Inclusive event hears that attacks against minorities have increased since the BJP came to power

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